Dr. Robyn’s Halloween Safety Tips for Families

10 Halloween Safety Tips and Tricks for Children, Parents, Pets, and Families

Dr. Robyn Silverman (Sign up for Dr. Robyn’s feed)

Halloween is a fun and exciting holiday for children and adults. But in order to keep Halloween and fair for children, teens, pets, and parents, everyone should be aware—and commit to– these 10 Halloween safety tips. Trick or Treating is always more fun when nobody gets hurt!

(1) Guarantee Halloween Supervision: No child should trick or treat by themselves even if they’re in a familiar neighborhood. Make sure a parent, other trusted adult, or teen-aged sibling or sitter can take your son or daughter from house to house.

a. If your child wants to expresses that they’re “big enough” to go without supervision, see if you feel comfortable allowing them to approach the houses on their own while you stay in full view on the sidewalk.

b. Know the route your child will be taking if you aren’t personally going with them.

c. Teens should go in a group—they might be older but the buddy system is always safer (and more fun!) than going it alone.

d. If the supervisor is a teen, be sure to discuss ground rules so everyone’s on the same page.

(2) Establish a Curfew: If your children are going with a sitter, older sibling, or other trusted adult, ensure that you agree on a time by which they should be home. Time discrepancies can cause undue anxiety—get it out of the way so you don’t have to think about it.

a. So there isn’t any question about what time it is, ensure that your child wears a watch s/he can easily see in the dark.

b. Make sure s/he knows how important it is to be home on time.

c. The adult or supervisor may want to carry a cell phone for quick communication—however, be sure that the supervisor isn’t talking or texting while s/he should be paying attention to your child!

(3) Ensure Powerful Character: Even if you’re not the one accompanying your child on the Trick or Treating Trip, talk to your child about using their Powerful Words and doing the right thing even when nobody’s looking or in the face of peer pressure. Encourage your children to make good choices based on values and character.

a. Vandalizing someone else’s house or property is never OK even if you’ve heard that “mischief night” or Halloween are exceptions. They’re not.

b. Hurting or throwing things at animals or other children won’t be tolerated.

c. In the immortal words of my grandmother, Thelma (“Nanny”), “please and thank-you are not dirty words.”

(4) Remember Halloween Costume Safety: Some costumes might be cute or funny—but if the children can’t see well out of the masks or can’t move well in the body of the costume, they aren’t the best choice. Children need to be able to see so that they can easily cross the street safely, walk up and down steps without incident, and move out of the way of danger, if necessary, with ease.

a. Costumes should be fire retardant or flame resistant. Candles and jack o’ lanterns are common on Halloween and accidents sometimes happen.

b. Ensure good peripheral vision out of the eye holes of masks, if used.

c. Be careful of Halloween props: If swords, sabers, pitch forks, or other items are used, be sure that they’re smooth, safe, flexible, and of no danger to anyone who might touch it, trip over it, or fall on it.

d. Make sure the costume fits. Shoes shouldn’t be too lose or too tight (even if they look good!) and costumes shouldn’t drag on the ground.

e. Just a note: Please refrain from putting your youngsters in “sexy” Halloween costumes. They send a twisted message that is both unintentional and inappropriate. Need I say more?

(5) Be Pumpkin Safe: Carving pumpkins can be a fun activity to do with children. However, young children should not be using sharp knives to carve out the pumpkin themselves. An adult should do that part.

a. While there are kits that allow children to do some carving, be careful. Children can still cut themselves. If your child is using such a kit, be sure to educate fully and supervise.

b. You can always have your child decorate the pumpkin with a permanent marker and other fun items like feathers, paints, stickers, and googly eyes. This is safer and just as fun.

(6) Make your Home Halloween Safe: Nothing ruins Halloween fun more than an accident on your property! While Halloween is often about “darkness” and “spooky props” remember safety first.

a. Your home should be well lit so that no child (or adult) trips over anything on the way to or from your door.

b. Set candles and jack o’ lanterns away from the door and walkway so that no costume is accidentally set on fire. Keep paper or other decorations away from any fire. You can also choose to use a battery powered light source or light stick in the place of live candles.

c. Be careful that no fire source is within reach of your pets. Wagging tails and excited animals can lead to accidents when fire is around. In addition, leave pets inside around Halloween time—aside from some stupid tricks some may want to play, the neighborhood children may not know that feeding animals candy can be dangerous.

(7) Educate Children about Halloween Safety: It’s been a year. Refresh your children’s memory about obeying traffic laws, not going inside anyone’s home, staying on sidewalks (when available), and being aware of the surroundings.

a. Children should carry a flashlight if they’re going in the late afternoon or evening time.

b. Children and teens should wear reflective clothes or reflective tape so that cars can see them.

c. Remind children not to get into anyone’s car and to always remain with the group and teen/adult supervisor.

d. Children should stay on a familiar, approved route—no short cuts through yards, parks, back alleys or dimly lit, less traveled areas. They might be used to taking short cuts across neighbor’s yards during day light hours, so be sure to impress upon them the importance of staying on populate paths during Halloween.

(8) Let’s talk Candy: Children can rack up a lot of candy on Halloween. Make sure your child isn’t eating it until you’ve taken a look through it and discarded anything opened or sketchy-looking.

a. Feed children a good, nutritious dinner before they go Trick or Treating so they don’t make a meal of the candy they collect from the neighbors.

b. Make sure you read candy ingredients if you are unsure if they contain anything to which your child may be allergic. If you still are unsure after reading the contents, you can always make your own treats.

c. While you don’t need to replace all candy with carrots, you also don’t have to allow your children to eat all their candy at once! Perhaps you’ve read some of my articles on how much sugar  is poured into the items children eat and drink these days. While Halloween only comes on comes once per year, that doesn’t mean that the children need to eat a year’s worth of candy in once sitting!

(9) Keep Pets Safe: There are a lot of people around on Halloween and not all of them know how to handle themselves around your family pets.

a. Warn children against feeding candy to pets or neighborhood animals. This can cause the animals to get very sick and can attract other, perhaps not as welcomed animals, to your child’s bag of candy!

b. Put a sign on your door that you have a pet (yes, even if friendly!) so that children are aware before ringing your doorbell. You don’t want them to accidentally open your door and let the cat out or be licked by a dog when they’re scared or allergic.

c. Pets might look cure in costumes but make sure that the costumes are safe and comfortable for the animal in question!

(10) Prepare Ahead: We still have a couple of days before Halloween so safety preparations can be made. Don’t wait until the day to talk about how to stay safe and make good choices on Halloween.

a. Make sure that your child knows his name, address and phone number. If s/he gets separated from the group, you can be reached. For young children, an address tag can be discreetly attached to their costume.

b. Review “Stop, Drop, and Roll.” While we are all aware that we need to be vigilant about candles, jack o’ lanterns, and other possible outside fire sources on Halloween, not everyone might. Teaching your children to Stop, Drop, and Roll can be a life saver. Talk about watching where you go but also what to do in the rare event that something on them catches fire.

c. Remind them that they can call 9-1-1 to get the police if there is an emergency. Go over some examples of emergencies in which 9-1-1 would be helpful or necessary.

From the Powerful Words family to yours, have a very Safe, Fun, and Happy Halloween! Do you have any great Halloween Tips for other families?  Please share below!

Photos:

Jupiter Images

Picture of my niece, Evie

City of Chiliwack website

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8 Responses

  1. Good tips, Dr. Robyn! Safety around Halloween is tough but vital. Just around now the sun goes down earlier and drivers are commuting around sundown or after. It’s danger city out there but with tips like yours and ours, we can all have a happy, safe fun holiday!

  2. Thanks, Carl– nice to have you visit! Your blog looks delicious!

    The more we are aware of the possible dangers, the more likely we will all be able to avoid them and spend time doing what really matters on Halloween…having fun!

    Dr. Robyn

  3. Regarding tip #8. The readers over at Inhabitots have made many great suggestions regarding alterna-treats as a part of our Green Halloween Contest. My suggestion is to hand out dried organic fruit as an instant treat, while Agail Doan suggest delaying the reward a bit giving the seeds that will bear the fruit. There are many more ‘green’ treat suggestions to review.

  4. Thank you Desmond- I have no doubt that many of our parents will be interested in some of your alternative treats for Halloween. So many of the treats are individually wrapped– which is good for safety– but not so great for the environment. I’ll look forward to checking out your blog further and seeing how your readers cope with walking the safe but still green line!

    Please come back again– we appreciate your insight.

    Dr. Robyn

  5. Great site, I’ll come back and read more when I have more time.

  6. You Have An Awesome Blog Keep Up The Good Work ..Cheers 🙂

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